Sep 3, 2019

Read a Feeler Gauge

broke a step into 2 steps for clarity

←Older revision Revision as of 00:01, 4 September 2019
Line 8: Line 8:
 
#*Feeler gauges are often referred to as “blades” or “leaves.”
 
#*Feeler gauges are often referred to as “blades” or “leaves.”
 
#*You can also remove the feeler gauge from the rest of the set if you need to reach it into a hard-to-reach spot.
 
#*You can also remove the feeler gauge from the rest of the set if you need to reach it into a hard-to-reach spot.
#Slide the feeler gauge into the gap you’re measuring to check it for friction. Use minimal force to push the gauge into the gap. If it doesn’t slide into the gap, try using the next gauge down to check. You should feel a small amount of friction when you insert the gauge, but not so much that it’s difficult to remove. If you don’t feel any friction, then the gauge is too thin and you need to try the next size up.<ref>https://ift.tt/2Lsgy1c>
+
#Slide the gauge into the gap you’re measuring to check for friction. Use minimal force to push the gauge into the gap. If it doesn’t slide into the gap, try using the next gauge down to check. You should feel a small amount of friction when you insert the gauge, but not so much that it’s difficult to remove.<ref>https://ift.tt/2Lsgy1c>
 
#*Don’t try to force a feeler gauge into a gap that’s too small since you could damage the parts or bend the gauge.
 
#*Don’t try to force a feeler gauge into a gap that’s too small since you could damage the parts or bend the gauge.
 
#*Your feeler gauge will either have a consistent thickness or a tapered end that gets thinner. If you have a tapered feeler gauge, the thinnest section is the actual measurement.
 
#*Your feeler gauge will either have a consistent thickness or a tapered end that gets thinner. If you have a tapered feeler gauge, the thinnest section is the actual measurement.
#*If the feeler gauge gets stuck in the gap, spray a lubricant like WD-40 onto it so it can slide out easily.
+
#*If the feeler gauge gets stuck in the gap, spray a lubricant like WD-40 onto it so it can slide out easily.
#*If none of your feeler gauges are large enough to fit in the gap, then stack 2 of the gauges on top of each other. Slide both gauges into the gap to see if they fit.
+
# Pull out the gauge and insert the next size up if you don't feel friction. If you don’t feel any friction, then the gauge is too thin and you need to try the next size up. Rotate the set on the pivot point to “unfold” it it and choose another size. Try to fit it into the gap just as you did before.
#Check the measurement printed on the gauge to determine the gap size. Once you find a feeler gauge that has friction when you put it into the gap, pull it out and look at the thickness measurement listed on the side. Check the label on the side of the gauge to see if it’s listed in thousandths of an inch or hundredths of a millimeter. Usually, thousandths of an inch are listed with 3 numbers after a decimal point and hundredths of a millimeter have 2 numbers after a decimal point.<ref>https://youtu.be/MPUhBGF1dyY?t=22</ref>
+
#Use 2 feeler gauges simultaneously if you can't find the right fit. If none of your feeler gauges are large enough to fit in the gap, then stack 2 of the gauges on top of each other. Slide both gauges into the gap to see if they fit. If they do, you can add their measurements together to calculate the gap width.
  +
#Read the measurement printed on the gauge to determine the gap size. Once you find a feeler gauge that has friction when you put it into the gap, pull it out and look at the thickness measurement listed on the side. Check the label on the side of the gauge to see if it’s listed in thousandths of an inch or hundredths of a millimeter.<ref>https://youtu.be/MPUhBGF1dyY?t=22</ref>
  +
#* Usually, thousandths of an inch are listed with 3 numbers after a decimal point and hundredths of a millimeter have 2 numbers after a decimal point.
 
#*Some feeler gauges will have both measurements printed on them. At least one of the measurements will be labeled so you know which one’s which.
 
#*Some feeler gauges will have both measurements printed on them. At least one of the measurements will be labeled so you know which one’s which.
#*If you had to use multiple feeler gauges to fit in the gap, then add their measurements together to get the gap thickness. For example, if you stacked feeler gauges that were , then the thickness of the gap is thick.
+
#Add the measurements together if you used multiple feeler gauges. If you had to use multiple feeler gauges to fit in the gap, then add their measurements together to get the gap thickness. For example, if you stacked feeler gauges that were , then the thickness of the gap is thick.
 
#Oil the feeler gauges after using them to prevent rust and sticking. Put a bead-sized amount of motor oil on a shop cloth or a paper towel and wipe the feeler gauges. Spread the oil over all of the gauges in the set with the shop cloth, opening and closing them so each gauge gets a thin coat of oil.<ref>https://youtu.be/eq-3zBA4fso?t=141</ref>
 
#Oil the feeler gauges after using them to prevent rust and sticking. Put a bead-sized amount of motor oil on a shop cloth or a paper towel and wipe the feeler gauges. Spread the oil over all of the gauges in the set with the shop cloth, opening and closing them so each gauge gets a thin coat of oil.<ref>https://youtu.be/eq-3zBA4fso?t=141</ref>
 
#*Oil helps the feeler gauges move freely so they don’t get caught in gaps.
 
#*Oil helps the feeler gauges move freely so they don’t get caught in gaps.


from wikiHow - Recent Changes [en] https://ift.tt/2ZxvaGt
via IFTTT

No comments:

Post a Comment