Jan 10, 2020

Get Rid of a Sunburn

adding relevant wikiHow link

←Older revision Revision as of 00:50, 11 January 2020
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#*Other reasons to see a doctor after a sunburn include symptoms of dehydration (see above) or [[Prevent Heat Exhaustion|heat exhaustion]] (heavy sweating, faintness, fatigue, weak but rapid pulse, low blood pressure and headache).<ref>https://ift.tt/37RAvZ9>
 
#*Other reasons to see a doctor after a sunburn include symptoms of dehydration (see above) or [[Prevent Heat Exhaustion|heat exhaustion]] (heavy sweating, faintness, fatigue, weak but rapid pulse, low blood pressure and headache).<ref>https://ift.tt/37RAvZ9>
 
#*For children, as a general guideline, seek medical attention if a blistering sunburn covers 20% or more of their body (a child's whole back, for example).<ref>https://ift.tt/2uyp6yU>
 
#*For children, as a general guideline, seek medical attention if a blistering sunburn covers 20% or more of their body (a child's whole back, for example).<ref>https://ift.tt/2uyp6yU>
#Get your blisters properly treated. Moderate-to-severe sunburn typically involves skin blistering, which is a natural protective reaction of your body. If you notice blisters form on your sunburned skin, don't pick at them or break any. Blisters contain your natural body fluid (serum) and form a protective layer over the burned skin.<ref>https://ift.tt/2LXSHIk> Breaking blisters also increases the risk of infection. If you have minimal blistering on accessible body parts (like your forearms, for example) then cover them with dry, absorbent bandages. However, if you have lots of blistering and its on your back or other inaccessible areas, then get your doctor to care for them. Your doctor will likely apply some antibiotic cream and dress the blisters properly with sterile bandages to limit the risk of infection, minimize scarring, and promote healing.[[Image:Get Rid of a Sunburn Step 8 Version 3.jpg|center]]
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#[[Treat a Blistered Sunburn|Get your blisters properly treated]]. Moderate-to-severe sunburn typically involves skin blistering, which is a natural protective reaction of your body. If you notice blisters form on your sunburned skin, don't pick at them or break any. Blisters contain your natural body fluid (serum) and form a protective layer over the burned skin.<ref>https://ift.tt/2LXSHIk> Breaking blisters also increases the risk of infection. If you have minimal blistering on accessible body parts (like your forearms, for example) then cover them with dry, absorbent bandages. However, if you have lots of blistering and its on your back or other inaccessible areas, then get your doctor to care for them. Your doctor will likely apply some antibiotic cream and dress the blisters properly with sterile bandages to limit the risk of infection, minimize scarring, and promote healing.[[Image:Get Rid of a Sunburn Step 8 Version 3.jpg|center]]
 
#*Change the bandages one to two times daily (if accessible), but remove them carefully so as to minimize further damage. Also, change the bandage immediately if it gets accidentally wet or dirty.
 
#*Change the bandages one to two times daily (if accessible), but remove them carefully so as to minimize further damage. Also, change the bandage immediately if it gets accidentally wet or dirty.
 
#*When the blisters do break open, apply an antibiotic ointment to the area and cover loosely with another clean bandage.
 
#*When the blisters do break open, apply an antibiotic ointment to the area and cover loosely with another clean bandage.


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