Feb 27, 2020

Professionally Paint a Home Interior

Edit from Article Greenhouse: FORMAT

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[[Category:House Painting]]
 
[[Category:House Painting]]
 
[[Category:Articles in Quality Review]]
 
[[Category:Articles in Quality Review]]
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== Steps ==
 
== Steps ==
 
=== Pre-labor preparation ===
 
=== Pre-labor preparation ===
# Choose your paint colors, along with preferred brand, line, and finish of paint for each surfaceHere are the recommended paint finish choices:FOR WALLS- If you have kids, pets or occupants who will damage the walls, it is recommended to go with washable matte, eggshell, or satin, because these paints can be easily cleaned and are more durable. However, flat paint can be touched up more easily and hides imperfections better, so if you are selling the home, it is highly recommended to go with flat. Bathrooms with showers/tubs should go in semigloss- unless you are selling or want a specific design look, then use satin. FOR TRIM: Semigloss is recommended. Satin is recommended if you want to have a design look where your trim is not very shiny.FOR CEILINGS: Flat is recommended, except semigloss or satin should be used in bathrooms with showers/tubs. Some customers opt to go with a different finish for ceilings in general, to create a specific design look, i.e. high gloss ceilings on dining room tray ceiling to make a statement, or eggshell ceilings throughout to look modern and make a statement. Here are the recommended paint "brand and line" choices:WALLS- if going with flat or eggshell/satin, we recommend Sherwin-Williams cashmere (if looks are most important), or Sherwin-Williams Superpaint (if durability is more important). If you want the highest quality paint for a reasonable price, go with Sherwin-Williams Duration. TRIM- Sherwin-Williams Emerald Urethane Enamel. It is worth every penny, cleans up easily, is extremely durable, and looks amazing.CEILING- Benjamin-Moore waterborne ceiling paint. (Except in bathrooms, use Superpaint or Duration in satin or semigloss).
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# Choose your paint colors, along with preferred brand, line, and finish of paint for each surface. Here are the recommended paint finish choices: FOR WALLS- If you have kids, pets or occupants who will damage the walls, it is recommended to go with washable matte, eggshell, or satin, because these paints can be easily cleaned and are more durable. However, flat paint can be touched up more easily and hides imperfections better, so if you are selling the home, it is highly recommended to go with flat. Bathrooms with showers/tubs should go in semigloss- unless you are selling or want a specific design look, then use satin. FOR TRIM: Semigloss is recommended. Satin is recommended if you want to have a design look where your trim is not very shiny.FOR CEILINGS: Flat is recommended, except semigloss or satin should be used in bathrooms with showers/tubs. Some customers opt to go with a different finish for ceilings in general, to create a specific design look, i.e. high gloss ceilings on dining room tray ceiling to make a statement, or eggshell ceilings throughout to look modern and make a statement. Here are the recommended paint "brand and line" choices:WALLS- if going with flat or eggshell/satin, we recommend Sherwin-Williams cashmere (if looks are most important), or Sherwin-Williams Superpaint (if durability is more important). If you want the highest quality paint for a reasonable price, go with Sherwin-Williams Duration. TRIM- Sherwin-Williams Emerald Urethane Enamel. It is worth every penny, cleans up easily, is extremely durable, and looks amazing.CEILING- Benjamin-Moore waterborne ceiling paint. (Except in bathrooms, use Superpaint or Duration in satin or semigloss).
# Measure for paint amountsThe easiest and fastest way to measure for paint amounts reliably, is the following:For ceilings- Google the home, take the floor plan square footage. Then multiply the floor plan by 2 (for 2 coats), add 10% for touch ups, and then divide by 400. For trim and doors- Start with of trim paint for every 600 sq feet of floor space. Purchase more at the store if/when needed. Trim is something that is difficult to calculate exactly, and it is more time-efficient to simply start with less than you need, and go buy more after you have used up the first round of paint and determined how much you will need to finish by seeing how much you have painted so far, compared to the gallons used.For walls- Measure the linear feet of wall space (measuring along the baseboards) for the areas to be painted (using a tape measure, laser, or both). Then multiply this by the ceiling height (usually it is 7.5 or 8). If there are 2 story areas, measure them separately, and multiply them by double the regular wall height. Then multiply the total number by 2 (for 2 coats). After you have done the multiplication, then you need to subtract 40 sq feet per window, and 60 sq feet per door. Then divide by 400 (interior paint covers 400 sq feet per gallon). The number that remains, is how many gallons you will need. If doing multiple wall colors, then you should do this process for each room (or sets of rooms) with a particular color. An example of the wall measurement would be: 40 linear feet of bedroom space, x 8 wall height, =  320, x 2 = 640. Minus 1 door (60) and 2 windows (80) = 500 sq feet being painted. Then divide the 500 by 400 (sq feet per gallon), and you get needed for that room. For this, you'd need and . If the amount it comes out to is over 1.3, we recommend just getting so that you have leftovers if needed, since costs essentially the same as a gallon in most stores.
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# Measure for paint amounts. The easiest and fastest way to measure for paint amounts reliably, is the following:For ceilings- Google the home, take the floor plan square footage. Then multiply the floor plan by 2 (for 2 coats), add 10% for touch ups, and then divide by 400. For trim and doors- Start with of trim paint for every 600 sq feet of floor space. Purchase more at the store if/when needed. Trim is something that is difficult to calculate exactly, and it is more time-efficient to simply start with less than you need, and go buy more after you have used up the first round of paint and determined how much you will need to finish by seeing how much you have painted so far, compared to the gallons used.For walls- Measure the linear feet of wall space (measuring along the baseboards) for the areas to be painted (using a tape measure, laser, or both). Then multiply this by the ceiling height (usually it is 7.5 or 8). If there are 2 story areas, measure them separately, and multiply them by double the regular wall height. Then multiply the total number by 2 (for 2 coats). After you have done the multiplication, then you need to subtract 40 sq feet per window, and 60 sq feet per door. Then divide by 400 (interior paint covers 400 sq feet per gallon). The number that remains, is how many gallons you will need. If doing multiple wall colors, then you should do this process for each room (or sets of rooms) with a particular color. An example of the wall measurement would be: 40 linear feet of bedroom space, x 8 wall height, =  320, x 2 = 640. Minus 1 door (60) and 2 windows (80) = 500 sq feet being painted. Then divide the 500 by 400 (sq feet per gallon), and you get needed for that room. For this, you'd need and . If the amount it comes out to is over 1.3, we recommend just getting so that you have leftovers if needed, since costs essentially the same as a gallon in most stores.
# Purchase the paint, and any necessary toolsTools you will need include: Drop cloths, plastic, green frog tape (best) or blue painters tape, 3-step stepladder, an extension ladder (16 to 30 feet depending on the size of the highest walls. Usually, it is 16, 20, or 24 foot ladder), ladder leg stabilizer for work in stairwells, brushes (2.5" tapered edge synthetic brushes), rollers and roller covers (we recommend 1/4" or 3/8" roller cover nap for best results, or a 1/2" sheepskin roller cover for faster completion), large paint tray, 2 five-gallon buckets (one to put 20-minute joint compound in, if you regularly paint this is great as you can keep it sealed easily in your car, and the other bucket to use for ceiling paint and later, after being cleaned out, the main wall color paint), a strainer (for inside the 5 gallon bucket, for the roller cover, to remove excess paint from the roller before painting. For high-end clients, skip the paint in the bucket, and use large trays... For faster completion and still quality results, the 5 gallon bucket and strainer work great), wood filler, 5-in-1 tool, screw gun (drill), metal joint compound tray, metal putty knife, wide drywall knife, mini hand-held paint containers (for brushes), a mini-roller and corresponding nap (for edging, after cutting in with brush on the bottom, top and sides of wall, and the sides of ceilings, so that you don't see brush lines).
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# Purchase the paint, and any necessary tools. Tools you will need include: Drop cloths, plastic, green frog tape (best) or blue painters tape, 3-step stepladder, an extension ladder (16 to 30 feet depending on the size of the highest walls. Usually, it is 16, 20, or 24 foot ladder), ladder leg stabilizer for work in stairwells, brushes (2.5" tapered edge synthetic brushes), rollers and roller covers (we recommend 1/4" or 3/8" roller cover nap for best results, or a 1/2" sheepskin roller cover for faster completion), large paint tray, 2 five-gallon buckets (one to put 20-minute joint compound in, if you regularly paint this is great as you can keep it sealed easily in your car, and the other bucket to use for ceiling paint and later, after being cleaned out, the main wall color paint), a strainer (for inside the 5 gallon bucket, for the roller cover, to remove excess paint from the roller before painting. For high-end clients, skip the paint in the bucket, and use large trays... For faster completion and still quality results, the 5 gallon bucket and strainer work great), wood filler, 5-in-1 tool, screw gun (drill), metal joint compound tray, metal putty knife, wide drywall knife, mini hand-held paint containers (for brushes), a mini-roller and corresponding nap (for edging, after cutting in with brush on the bottom, top and sides of wall, and the sides of ceilings, so that you don't see brush lines).
 
# If you are doing other remodeling projects, then consider when in the schedule to paint We recommend installing cabinets, flooring and countertops after painting, but doing the demo (demolition, aka removal) of floors, counters, cabinets, etc, before painting. This way, it gives you a clean surface to paint, without having to worry about drips or damage to new materials, and also not having to worry that the demo kicks up dust and scratches/dirties the new walls, ceilings and trim. If you are refinishing floors, they should be done 7 days prior to the paint job (given 7 days to fully cure, so that the floors can be safely walked on). To cover newly refinished floors, a mix of ramboard and/or clean drop cloths should be used, to completely cover the floors. If you are having bathrooms remodeled, they should be remodeled prior to the painting starting; and any new tile should be carefully covered with plastic, completely taped off and sealed, prior to painting so that dust or paint does not get into the grout.
 
# If you are doing other remodeling projects, then consider when in the schedule to paint We recommend installing cabinets, flooring and countertops after painting, but doing the demo (demolition, aka removal) of floors, counters, cabinets, etc, before painting. This way, it gives you a clean surface to paint, without having to worry about drips or damage to new materials, and also not having to worry that the demo kicks up dust and scratches/dirties the new walls, ceilings and trim. If you are refinishing floors, they should be done 7 days prior to the paint job (given 7 days to fully cure, so that the floors can be safely walked on). To cover newly refinished floors, a mix of ramboard and/or clean drop cloths should be used, to completely cover the floors. If you are having bathrooms remodeled, they should be remodeled prior to the painting starting; and any new tile should be carefully covered with plastic, completely taped off and sealed, prior to painting so that dust or paint does not get into the grout.
   


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