Mar 27, 2020

Speak Brazilian Portuguese

←Older revision Revision as of 07:21, 27 March 2020
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#*Cursing is frowned upon in more formal situations, obviously, but if you're blending in at the local bar watching the football game, it's gonna come up. "Porra" is a good word to start with for expressing general frustration.
 
#*Cursing is frowned upon in more formal situations, obviously, but if you're blending in at the local bar watching the football game, it's gonna come up. "Porra" is a good word to start with for expressing general frustration.
 
#*As for sounds, the starkest contrast is with the "r" and it should be a bit more guttural (remember how it's pronounced like an "h?") Think something closer to "loch." This goes for all "r" sounds that are at the beginning or end of a word, those that have been doubled, or those preceded by an "n" or "l."  
 
#*As for sounds, the starkest contrast is with the "r" and it should be a bit more guttural (remember how it's pronounced like an "h?") Think something closer to "loch." This goes for all "r" sounds that are at the beginning or end of a word, those that have been doubled, or those preceded by an "n" or "l."  
#*"S" at the end of words or syllables followed by an unvoiced consonant (t, c, f, p) gets turned to "sh" here. So "meus pais" becomes "mih-oosh pah-eesh."
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#*"S" at the end of words or syllables that are followed by an unvoiced consonant (t, c, f, p) gets turned to "sh" here. So "meus pais" becomes "mih-oosh pah-eesh."
 
#Know how loan words work. Specifically, those that end in a consonant other than "r," "s," or "m." Those get pronounced as if an "e" got smushed invisibly onto the end. "Internet" is actually pronounced "eeng-teH-NE-chee." Yeah. Say that three times fast. And then there are words like hip-hop -- can you guess? -- It's like "hippee hoppee!"[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 7 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#Know how loan words work. Specifically, those that end in a consonant other than "r," "s," or "m." Those get pronounced as if an "e" got smushed invisibly onto the end. "Internet" is actually pronounced "eeng-teH-NE-chee." Yeah. Say that three times fast. And then there are words like hip-hop -- can you guess? -- It's like "hippee hoppee!"[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 7 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*Loan words are actually a lot more common in Brazilian Portuguese than European Portuguese and European Spanish. For example,  it's "mouse" for a computer mouse in all of South America but "ratón" across the pond. Kinda makes sense -- the majority of them are from America -- it's harder to make a jump across the Atlantic.
 
#*Loan words are actually a lot more common in Brazilian Portuguese than European Portuguese and European Spanish. For example,  it's "mouse" for a computer mouse in all of South America but "ratón" across the pond. Kinda makes sense -- the majority of them are from America -- it's harder to make a jump across the Atlantic.
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#*Feliz Dia dos Pais      =  Happy Father's Day
 
#*Feliz Dia dos Pais      =  Happy Father's Day
 
=== Building Your Vocabulary===
 
=== Building Your Vocabulary===
#Learn the numbers. Ah, like being a toddler again. In order to have your most basic of understanding -- be it at the supermarket, the bar, or on the road, you gotta know the numbers. There's a masculine and feminine version for one, two, and the hundreds, by the way. Here are the basics:[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 13 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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#Learn the numbers. Ah, like being a toddler again. In order to have your most basic of understanding—be it at the supermarket, the bar, or on the road, you got to know the numbers. There's a masculine and feminine version for one, two, and the hundreds, by the way. Here are the basics:[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 13 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*1 - ''um''/''uma'' (a masculine noun would use ''um'' and a feminine noun, ''uma'')
 
#*1 - ''um''/''uma'' (a masculine noun would use ''um'' and a feminine noun, ''uma'')
 
#*2 - ''dois''/''duas''
 
#*2 - ''dois''/''duas''
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#*Ugly - ''feio''/''feia''
 
#*Ugly - ''feio''/''feia''
 
#*New - ''novo''/''nova''
 
#*New - ''novo''/''nova''
#*Nouns are inherently feminine or masculine in Portuguese and the adjective must match them. Whatever you're talking about, know that it has a gender -- if you need to describe it, that gender must match. Generally, feminine versions end in "-a."
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#*Nouns are inherently feminine or masculine in Portuguese and the adjective must match them. Whatever you're talking about, know that it has a gender—if you need to describe it, that gender must match. Generally, feminine versions end in "-a."
#Learn how to talk about people. Portuguese is one of those languages where the verbs have to match the noun -- so knowing the noun is pretty important! Here are your options:[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 17 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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#Learn how to talk about people. Portuguese is one of those languages where the verbs have to match the noun or pronoun subject(s)—so knowing the pronouns is pretty important! Here are your options:[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 17 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*I - ''Eu''
 
#*I - ''Eu''
 
#*You - ''Tu'' or ''você''
 
#*You - ''Tu'' or ''você''
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#*To walk - ''andar''
 
#*To walk - ''andar''
 
#*  to see = ver
 
#*  to see = ver
#Be able to conjugate those verbs. Unfortunately, being able to say "I to be American" isn't that impressive -- you have to make is so your verbs match your subjects. Since some verbs are quite different, let's just cover the regular right now. If you know Spanish, this'll be cake. For those that don't, know that the ending indicates whether the verb goes with I, you, he/she/it, we, you, or they as the subject.[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 19 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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#Be able to conjugate those verbs. Unfortunately, being able to say "I to be American" isn't that impressive—you have to make is so your verbs match your subjects. Since some verbs are quite different, let's just cover the regular right now. If you know Spanish, this'll be cake. For those that don't, know that the ending indicates whether the verb goes with I, you, he/she/it, we, you, or they as the subject.[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 19 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*"Ar" verbs, like comprar, conjugate like -o, -as, -a, -amos, -ais, -am. So that's "compro," "compras," "compra," "compramos," "comprais," "compram."  
 
#*"Ar" verbs, like comprar, conjugate like -o, -as, -a, -amos, -ais, -am. So that's "compro," "compras," "compra," "compramos," "comprais," "compram."  
 
#*"Er" verbs, like comer, conjugate like -o, -es, -e, -emos, -eis, -em. So that's "como," "comes," "come," "comemos," "comeis," "comem."
 
#*"Er" verbs, like comer, conjugate like -o, -es, -e, -emos, -eis, -em. So that's "como," "comes," "come," "comemos," "comeis," "comem."
 
#*"Ir" verbs, like partire, conjugate like -o, -es, -e, -imos, -is, -em. So that's "parto," "partes," "parte," "partimos," "partis," "partem."
 
#*"Ir" verbs, like partire, conjugate like -o, -es, -e, -imos, -is, -em. So that's "parto," "partes," "parte," "partimos," "partis," "partem."
 
#*Of course, these are just three regular examples and that's ''just'' in the indicative. There are tons of irregular verbs and loads of tenses, but to cover those would take hours and hours and hours of your time.
 
#*Of course, these are just three regular examples and that's ''just'' in the indicative. There are tons of irregular verbs and loads of tenses, but to cover those would take hours and hours and hours of your time.
#Learn how to tell time in Portuguese. ''Que horas sao, por favor?'' Translation - What time is it, please? Gotta know how long you have till closing time![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 20 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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#Learn how to tell time in Portuguese. ''Que horas sao, por favor?'' Translation: “What time is it, please? Gotta know how long you have till closing time![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 20 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*''É uma hora''           =  It is 1 o'clock
 
#*''É uma hora''           =  It is 1 o'clock
 
#*''São duas horas''   =  It is 2 o'clock
 
#*''São duas horas''   =  It is 2 o'clock
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#Use interactive online tools. There are a bunch of websites that can help with your speaking skills. BBC and Memrise are just two websites that offer interactive quiz features that can help you grow your database of knowledge and are way, way more than just reading words and hoping you remember them. It's fun to boot![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 21 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#Use interactive online tools. There are a bunch of websites that can help with your speaking skills. BBC and Memrise are just two websites that offer interactive quiz features that can help you grow your database of knowledge and are way, way more than just reading words and hoping you remember them. It's fun to boot![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 21 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*Listen to tracks and videos online to help you with pronunciation. Since the rules are a bit all over the place, immersing yourself in them as often as possible is the best thing you can do to curve the mistakes that keep springing up.
 
#*Listen to tracks and videos online to help you with pronunciation. Since the rules are a bit all over the place, immersing yourself in them as often as possible is the best thing you can do to curve the mistakes that keep springing up.
#Take a class. Being forced to speak the language for a couple of hours a week sometimes gives us the motivation we wouldn't otherwise have. Seek out a school or community center nearby that offers Portuguese classes -- for conversation, business, or just general learning. Any and all exposure will do you good![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 22 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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#Take a class. Being forced to speak the language for a couple of hours a week sometimes gives us the motivation we wouldn't otherwise have. Seek out a school or community center nearby that offers Portuguese classes—for conversation, business, or just general learning. Any and all exposure will do you good![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 22 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#*The smaller the class, the better. And if it's large, try to meet someone that you can practice one-on-one with whose skills are a bit better than yours. Study groups can get you practicing every day when class isn't often enough to really build and grow.
 
#*The smaller the class, the better. And if it's large, try to meet someone that you can practice one-on-one with whose skills are a bit better than yours. Study groups can get you practicing every day when class isn't often enough to really build and grow.
 
#Talk to natives. It's nerve-wracking, but it's the quickest and most efficient way to get your skills honed. They know their language is difficult, so don't be worried about making mistakes. They'll just be glad you made the effort! It'll only get less stressful the more and more you do it.[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 23 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#Talk to natives. It's nerve-wracking, but it's the quickest and most efficient way to get your skills honed. They know their language is difficult, so don't be worried about making mistakes. They'll just be glad you made the effort! It'll only get less stressful the more and more you do it.[[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 23 Version 2.jpg|center]]
#*This is part of the reason signing up for a class is such a good idea. Your teacher or your classmates may have access to a circle that you don't and that you can become a part of. You'll be able to meet people in ways you never could've otherwise -- and get something out of it, too.
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#*This is part of the reason signing up for a class is such a good idea. Your teacher or your classmates may have access to a circle that you don't and that you can become a part of. You'll be able to meet people in ways you never could've otherwise—and get something out of it, too.
#Use all your skills. You may think speaking is the only way to get better at speaking, but working on your reading, writing, and listening (especially listening) can help, too. Sure, speaking is the best -- but being good at the other ones won't hurt! So pick up a book, start a journal in Portuguese, and listen to documentaries, movies, and music. Do whatever you can get your hands on![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 24 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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#Use all your skills. You may think speaking is the only way to get better at speaking, but working on your reading, writing, and listening (especially listening) can help, too. Sure, speaking is the best, but being good at the other ones won't hurt! So pick up a book, start a journal in Portuguese, and listen to documentaries, movies, and music. Do whatever you can get your hands on![[Image:Speak Brazilian Portuguese Step 24 Version 2.jpg|center]]
#*YouTube is a great place to start. There are myriad tutorials online that can get your brain primed for this language, triggering your words faster, quicker, and easier.
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#*YouTube is a great place to start. There are myriad tutorials online that can get your brain primed for this language, triggering your words faster and easier.
   
 
== Related wikiHows ==
 
== Related wikiHows ==


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