Mar 1, 2020

Tenderize Pork

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←Older revision Revision as of 03:48, 2 March 2020
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#Use a tenderizing marinade. Marinades are a great way to both add flavor to meat and make it more tender. However, not all marinades are created equal &mdash; to tenderize pork, your marinade needs to contain either an acid or a tenderizing enzyme. Both of these types of chemicals break down the tightly coiled proteins in meat on the molecular level. However, using too much of either of these substances is a bad idea &mdash; too much acid can actually make meat tougher by denaturing its proteins and too much tenderizing enzyme can make meat mushy.<ref>http://www.finecooking.com/articles/marinades-flavor-tenderize.aspx</ref>[[Image:Tenderize Pork Step 2 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#Use a tenderizing marinade. Marinades are a great way to both add flavor to meat and make it more tender. However, not all marinades are created equal &mdash; to tenderize pork, your marinade needs to contain either an acid or a tenderizing enzyme. Both of these types of chemicals break down the tightly coiled proteins in meat on the molecular level. However, using too much of either of these substances is a bad idea &mdash; too much acid can actually make meat tougher by denaturing its proteins and too much tenderizing enzyme can make meat mushy.<ref>http://www.finecooking.com/articles/marinades-flavor-tenderize.aspx</ref>[[Image:Tenderize Pork Step 2 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#* Acids like citrus juices, vinegars, and wines are common in many pork marinade recipes. For instance, it's not uncommon to see red wine paired with soy sauce and other ingredients (like brown sugar) as a pork marinade.<ref>https://ift.tt/2Tq5tSu> To avoid the toughening effect that can occur with strongly acidic marinades, you may want to use an acidic dairy product instead &mdash; yogurt and buttermilk are only mildly acidic and make great marinade bases for juicy, delicious pork chops.
 
#* Acids like citrus juices, vinegars, and wines are common in many pork marinade recipes. For instance, it's not uncommon to see red wine paired with soy sauce and other ingredients (like brown sugar) as a pork marinade.<ref>https://ift.tt/2Tq5tSu> To avoid the toughening effect that can occur with strongly acidic marinades, you may want to use an acidic dairy product instead &mdash; yogurt and buttermilk are only mildly acidic and make great marinade bases for juicy, delicious pork chops.
#* Tenderizing enzymes can be found in the juices of several fruits. For instance, pineapple, which contains the enzyme bromelain, and papaya, which contains the enzyme papain, are both excellent tenderizing ingredients.<ref>http://www.biotechlearn.org.nz/themes/biotech_at_home/fruit_enzymes_tenderise_meat</ref> However, it's important to remember that in high doses, these enzymes can work ''too'' well, producing mushy meat.
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#* Tenderizing enzymes can be found in the juices of several fruits. For instance, pineapple, which contains the enzyme bromelain, and papaya, which contains the enzyme papain, are both excellent tenderizing ingredients.<ref>https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/1945-fruit-enzymes-tenderise-meat</ref> However, it's important to remember that in high doses, these enzymes can work ''too'' well, producing mushy meat.
 
#Brine the pork. Brining is a technique similar to marinating that is especially well-suited to lean cuts of pork (like loin chops). Brining involves soaking your meat in salt water to increase the tenderness and moistness of the final dish. Brines always contain salt and water, but can also include other ingredients for added flavor like apple cider, brown sugar, rosemary, and thyme. Because brining can give the pork a salty taste, generally, you'll want to avoid applying too much salt when eating your pork or applying a salty dry rub after brining.[[Image:Tenderize Pork Step 3 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#Brine the pork. Brining is a technique similar to marinating that is especially well-suited to lean cuts of pork (like loin chops). Brining involves soaking your meat in salt water to increase the tenderness and moistness of the final dish. Brines always contain salt and water, but can also include other ingredients for added flavor like apple cider, brown sugar, rosemary, and thyme. Because brining can give the pork a salty taste, generally, you'll want to avoid applying too much salt when eating your pork or applying a salty dry rub after brining.[[Image:Tenderize Pork Step 3 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#* For a great brine recipe, combine water, 3/4 cup salt, 3/4 cup sugar, and black pepper to taste in a large bowl and stir to dissolve (heating the water in a pot can speed up the dissolving process).  Add your pork to the bowl, cover, and refrigerate until you begin cooking.  
 
#* For a great brine recipe, combine water, 3/4 cup salt, 3/4 cup sugar, and black pepper to taste in a large bowl and stir to dissolve (heating the water in a pot can speed up the dissolving process).  Add your pork to the bowl, cover, and refrigerate until you begin cooking.  
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