Apr 22, 2020

Study Lecture Notes

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←Older revision Revision as of 01:12, 23 April 2020
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#*While waiting to reread might sound counterintuitive (Won’t you forget a lot by waiting, after all?), cognitive psychologists have found that the closer you are to forgetting the material, the more you will cement the information to your long-term memory through the process of re-exposure and remembering.<ref>https://ift.tt/2x3RgDG>
 
#*While waiting to reread might sound counterintuitive (Won’t you forget a lot by waiting, after all?), cognitive psychologists have found that the closer you are to forgetting the material, the more you will cement the information to your long-term memory through the process of re-exposure and remembering.<ref>https://ift.tt/2x3RgDG>
 
#*Additionally, read your notes aloud. This converts a passive activity into an active one and creates auditory links in your memory pathways.<ref>https://ift.tt/2VwpXLD>
 
#*Additionally, read your notes aloud. This converts a passive activity into an active one and creates auditory links in your memory pathways.<ref>https://ift.tt/2VwpXLD>
#*Mix up the topics you study. Let’s say you’ve set aside two hours of studying per day. Instead of spending an entire study session studying your notes from one class, spend a ½ hour studying one subject, a ½ hour studying another subject, and then repeat. Mixing up topics in this way (interleaving) requires a type of information reloading that forces your brain to notice similarities and differences – a higher order of information processing that leads to greater comprehension and long-term retention.<ref>https://ift.tt/2Vs3K18>
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#*Mix up the topics you study. Let’s say you’ve set aside two hours of studying per day. Instead of spending an entire study session studying your notes from one class, spend a ½ hour studying one subject, a ½ hour studying another subject, and then repeat. Mixing up topics in this way (interleaving) requires a type of information reloading that forces your brain to notice similarities and differences – a higher order of information processing that leads to greater comprehension and long-term retention.
 
#*Part of this study technique’s modus operandi is that as soon as you begin to feel like you really know the material, you need to switch it up and work on something else for awhile. So put away that blue notebook and pull out the red one.
 
#*Part of this study technique’s modus operandi is that as soon as you begin to feel like you really know the material, you need to switch it up and work on something else for awhile. So put away that blue notebook and pull out the red one.
 
#Reduce your notes. The same day as you take your notes, or shortly thereafter, summarize your notes. Identifying the key points, concepts, dates, names and examples provided in the lecture, write a summary of that lecture’s notes in your own words. Writing them in your own words will force you to flex those brain muscles. The more you flex them, the stronger they will become. (There really is truth to the adage, “If you don’t use it, you lose it!”) Finally, write down any questions you have related to the material so that you can seek further clarification.<ref>http://www.niagara.edu/assets/listpage/How-to-Study-College-Lecture-Notes.pdf</ref>[[Image:Study Lecture Notes Step 5 Version 2.jpg|center]]
 
#Reduce your notes. The same day as you take your notes, or shortly thereafter, summarize your notes. Identifying the key points, concepts, dates, names and examples provided in the lecture, write a summary of that lecture’s notes in your own words. Writing them in your own words will force you to flex those brain muscles. The more you flex them, the stronger they will become. (There really is truth to the adage, “If you don’t use it, you lose it!”) Finally, write down any questions you have related to the material so that you can seek further clarification.<ref>http://www.niagara.edu/assets/listpage/How-to-Study-College-Lecture-Notes.pdf</ref>[[Image:Study Lecture Notes Step 5 Version 2.jpg|center]]
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== Tips ==
 
== Tips ==
*At the end of the day, interact with your notes in as many ways as possible. Each interaction creates a memory, and the more varied the memories the stronger they will be.<ref>https://ift.tt/2Vs3K18>
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*At the end of the day, interact with your notes in as many ways as possible. Each interaction creates a memory, and the more varied the memories the stronger they will be.
*So, another way to do this is to study in a variety of locations. Our brains pick up cues from our surroundings and then form associations to what we are studying. By switching up where we study, we create more context cues, or connections, to the material. This translates to stronger memories. <ref>https://ift.tt/2Vs3K18>
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*So, another way to do this is to study in a variety of locations. Our brains pick up cues from our surroundings and then form associations to what we are studying. By switching up where we study, we create more context cues, or connections, to the material. This translates to stronger memories.
 
*Make sure you are in the right state of mind when you are studying your notes. If you have pressing concerns that are distracting you, and you find your mind drifting regularly, now might not be the best time to study. In fact, it might be a waste of time.
 
*Make sure you are in the right state of mind when you are studying your notes. If you have pressing concerns that are distracting you, and you find your mind drifting regularly, now might not be the best time to study. In fact, it might be a waste of time.
 
*Don't wait until the last minute to study your notes. Cramming before a test relies upon committing things only to short-term memory, which has very limited capacity. You may be able to correctly answer a fair number of questions the next day (research shows they'll most likely involve things you studied first and last), but you won't remember them in the long term, or when that final exam rolls around.
 
*Don't wait until the last minute to study your notes. Cramming before a test relies upon committing things only to short-term memory, which has very limited capacity. You may be able to correctly answer a fair number of questions the next day (research shows they'll most likely involve things you studied first and last), but you won't remember them in the long term, or when that final exam rolls around.


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